HomeBooks by SubjectTravel (Page 6)

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 29, 2012

Elizabeth Singer Hunt
Photo credit: David Peters

Elizabeth Singer Hunt is the bestselling author of the hugely popular Jack Stalwart series. Her love of adventure and travel is what inspired her to create her globe-trotting children’s book character, nine-year-old Secret Agent Jack Stalwart. More than 1 million books have been sold worldwide and the series has been published in multiple languages. It has been selected by the British Education Secretary as a “must read” for boys, and honored by the Moonbeam Children’s Book Award for “helping to inspire children to read, to learn and to dream.” Elizabeth kindly shared some tales of her own adventures and her path to literary success. You might want to take notes…

By Nina Schuyler, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 9, 2012

Justin Case: Shells, Smells, and the Horrible Flip-Flops of Doom
Illustration copyright © 2012 by Matthew Cordell

June shrugged off school’s schedule—the drop offs and pick-ups and the packing of lunch. Summer seemed to stretch out like a wide open lawn. But the acreage quickly filled with the schedule of camps—with drop offs and pick-ups and the packing of lunch.

Right about now, there’s something in the air. Maybe it’s the lighting or a new scent. But you begin to feel that summer is nearing its end. Before the scaffolding of the school schedule is fitted again, there is another attempt to get rid of routine. This, I think, is the real heart of summer. An earnest attempt to be schedule-less, to open up to unpredictability, maybe even to lose the concept of time. How? Travel. People pack their bags and go. Somewhere. Anywhere. Stay-over-night camp, relatives in another state, another city, anywhere other than where you are, it really doesn’t matter, just as long as rhythms and routines are set aside.

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: December 22, 2011

Interview with the author and photographer behind Kiki & Coco in Paris—a child’s exciting adventures in the City of Light

Nina Gruener is the author of three children’s books Above San Francisco and Above New York and most recently Kiki & Coco in Paris. Stephanie Rausser is a lifestyle photographer who has had her work featured all over the world. Together, they created Kiki & Coco in Paris, the tender story of a young girl visiting Paris for the first time with her doll.

Nicki Richesin: Congratulations on your beautiful new book Kiki & Coco in Paris. I’m sure it will make a delightful gift for little girls this holiday season. Could you tell us about how you began the project and a bit about your collaboration?

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 31, 2011

Ready to be globally inspired? Explorers and travelers and those open to new and wonderful discoveries will revel in the journey of this journal—an enjoyable trip through the rich culture of China. We have two (2) copies of My China Travel Journal to giveaway and both are signed by author Laura Barta! Giveaway begins August 31, 2011, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends September 27, 2011, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Reading level: Ages 8-12

Paperback: 32 pages

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 10, 2010

Monika Schröder

TCBR: Saraswati’s Way, is your second published novel. It’s set in India, where you currently live. Tell us about the book and its main character, 12-year-old Akash.

Monika Schröder: The book tells the story of 12-year old Akash, from the rural northern Indian state of Rajasthan. He has a gift for math. Numbers line up in his head easily, arrange themselves in patterns, and move in formations. In order to develop his gift for numbers Akash wants to go to a school in the city. But Akash’s family is poor and doesn’t understand his longing for learning. He prays to the Hindu gods Ganesh and Saraswati. When circumstances become so dire that his dream seems forever unattainable he makes an extreme decision, and runs away. After an adventurous train ride, he ends up in the New Delhi station, where he joins a gang of street kids. Finally, with the help of a newspaper vendor he learns that Saraswati will only help him if he deserves it.