By Amanda Lynch, The Children’s Book Review
Published: July 30, 2009

As I mentioned back in April, I thoroughly enjoyed reading Michael Spradlin’s The Youngest Templar: Keeper of the Grail. The book seemed so well-done, so well-researched, I couldn’t put it down–or stop recommending it to anyone and everyone who I thought might have even a passing interest in it! Needless to say,  I was extremely excited to interview Mr. Spradlin on the newest installment in Tristan’s journey, which comes out in September:  The Youngest Templar: Trail of Fate.

By Reading is Fundamental
Published: July 28, 2009

Perhaps the teenager in your family was once an avid reader, but now hardly ever opens a book, or perhaps your child never liked reading in the first place.

You know that reading is important, and you obviously want to make sure that your teenager grows into adulthood with all the skills he or she needs to succeed.

What can you do?

By Luisa LaFleur, The Children’s Book Review
Published: July 28, 2009

Everybody has days when we wish we could be someone else, or do something else. Kids, too. I know my three-year-old is always trying on new hats (figuratively and literally!). I recently came across a book that helps our little ones see it’s okay if they aren’t too good at one thing because that gives them the opportunity to try something else.

By Luisa LaFleur, The Children’s Book Review
Published: July 24, 2009

Little ones having trouble sleeping? Afraid of what lurks in the shadowy corners of their rooms? That puny night light isn’t enough? Then fear not! Two recently published books purport to help our little ones sleep soundly in the peace and comfort of their own beds. What sleep-deprived parent wouldn’t be interested in these? Especially given that both books were created with the help of developmental psychologists and other childhood experts. I know I was quick to try them out!

By Reading Is Fundamental
Published: July 23, 2009

How to Lead Reluctant Readers Age 9-13 Back to Books

Studies show what common sense tells us: the more kids read, the better they read and the more pleasure they get out of reading.

Unfortunately, the reverse holds true: children who read very little usually have poor reading skills. Reading is a struggle for them, and they avoid it whenever possible.

Is there anything that you can do to encourage your children to read?