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Author Showcase

By Howard M. Bricker, for The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 30, 2011

Each Christmas season children see a beardless, or fake bearded Santa Claus in malls and on television shows leaving them confused and skeptical.  Upon reading The Christmas Santa Had No Beard, children and parents alike will finally discover just how Santa can lose his beard. They will meet the disgruntled Baldy, the North Pole barber, who has asked for hair since childhood without having any success.  Readers will accompany this beardless Santa on this epic Christmas journey as he encounters one problem after another.

Author Showcase

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 30, 2011

“Gramps Bricker” is a story telling grandparent who has seen his children, grandchildren, and now his great grandchildren voice their doubts upon seeing so many Santas everywhere without a beard. He created a story, The Christmas Santa Had No Beard, with the purpose of restoring the magical  legend of Santa Claus within every child’s imagination.

TCBR: Can you share a little on your background and how you became a children’s book writer?

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 29, 2011

During the holiday season it’s a great joy to share family traditions and spend time together. Every year, I look forward to reading these beloved books below to my daughter.

The Story of Holly & Ivy

By Rumer Godden; illustrated by Barbara Cooney

Rumer Godden begins The Story of Holly & Ivy with the sweetest line, “This is a story about wishing.” When an orphan named Ivy and a dreamy doll named Holly see each other through a toy shop window, magic happens. In this classic Christmas tale, Holly and Ivy both find a sense of belonging in their new home and to each other. Wishes come true in part thanks to Barbara Cooney’s tender illustrations of the festive village and toys. Godden captures the precious beauty of a brave girl unwilling to give up on her dream. (Ages 5-10)

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 27, 2011

Enter to win one of two signed copies of The Taste of Snow by Stephen V. Masse.

It’s time to “adventure” into the holidays! After Nicole Kinder’s first taste of a magical candy cane, it seems the whole world becomes more colorful, more delicious, and more dangerous. Giveaway begins November 28, 2011, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends December 26, 2011, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Reading level: Ages 8-14

Hardcover: 207 pages

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 27, 2011

Angelica Shirley Carpenter

Angelica Shirley Carpenter is the author of many acclaimed biographies written for young people including Frances Hodgson Burnett: Beyond the Secret Garden, L. Frank Baum: Royal Historian of Oz, Robert Louis Stevenson: Finding Treasure Island, and Lewis Carroll: Through the Looking Glass. She also edited In the Garden: Essays in Honor of Frances Hodgson Burnett. Carpenter is the founding curator of the Arne Nixon Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at California State University in Fresno.

Author Showcase

By Jennifer Stone, for The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 26, 2011

Stormi Claver is a seventeen-year-old girl living in a land driven by prejudice and fear. When Stormi is captured by Rylan, the rogue Finin prince, she fears her death is near, for their clans share a common curse – to war with one another until none remain.

Her fear heightens when she learns Rylan is taking her to the Temple of the Swords – home of the evil Goddess that cursed their clans; a place where no Claver has ever left alive.

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 24, 2011

Kathleen Krull. Photo credit: Paul Brewer

Kathleen Krull is an award-winning author of many, many children’s books, including most recently Jim Henson: The Guy Who Played With Puppets. She specializes in biographies written especially for children. Krull lives in San Diego with her husband Paul Brewer a children’s book illustrator. She once worked a part-time job at a library and was fired for reading too often. Now she can read to her heart’s content- all in the service of research for her wonderful books!