HomeBooks by AgeAges 4-8Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, by Laurie Wallmark | Book Review

Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, by Laurie Wallmark | Book Review

The Children’s Book Review | March 3, 2017

Grace Hopper Computer QueenGrace Hopper: Queen Of Computer Code

Written by Laurie Wallmark

Illustrated by Katy Wu

Age Range: 5-7

Publisher: Sterling Children’s Books (2017)

ISBN: 978-1-4549-2000-7

What to Expect: Computers, Science, Empowered and Inspiring Female Character.

There are enough picture books about princesses around; but what is there to inspire young readers to seek happiness and success in our modern, technological era? Laurie Wallmark and Sterling Children’s Books have provided one answer to this critically vexed question in Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code. This wonderful true-life narrative tells the story of one of the foremost women in computing history and science: Grace Hopper, the woman who revolutionized binary computer code.

The most important feature to point out, of course, is the positive blow this volume provides in terms of supporting gender inclusivity in STEM. By bringing to light the fact that not only are women currently active in the technology industry, but also that they have been instrumental from its inception, volumes such as this one remind readers everywhere that the gender glass ceiling in STEM can and should be removed. Even more engaging about this volume, however, is the narrative format which highlights success as a process and a journey. The volume follows Grace’s progress though her education and interests as a child, her work at college, and her initial profession as a teacher, before detailing her contributions to computing and coding. The message for readers is clear: even if success is not immediately visible on the horizon, you should pursue your strengths and passions, because the only thing which truly has the power to advance or hinder your success is your own dedication and perseverance. A beautiful story, told beautifully.

Available Here: 


About Laurie Wallmark

Laurie Wallmark is passionate about getting the word out to young people about successful women in science. She has degrees in Biochemistry from Princeton University, Information Systems from Goddard College, and Writing for Children and Young Adults from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her debut book was a picture book biography of Ada Byron Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer. Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine (Creston Books) received four starred reviews (Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, Booklist, and School Library Journal), praise in The New York Times, and numerous awards. Laurie lives in NJ. Follow her on Facebook: @lauriewallmark.

Click here to join Laurie as she travels from blog to blog to introduce her picture book biography, Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code.

About Katy Wu

With a BFA in Illustration and Entertainment Arts from Pasadena Art Center College of Design in 2007, Katy Wu has worked for Google, Laika, Pixar, CinderBiter, and Simon & Schuster. Grace Hopper is her first picture book; her second, Dumpling Dreams, written by Carrie Clickard (Simon and Schuster), is scheduled for fall 2017. Having worked on such projects as the feature film Coraline, and various shorts (La LunaCar Toons) as well as CG, 2D, stop motion, online games, and content for social media platforms, Katy is an incredible talent. She lives and freelances in New York City. Follow her online at katycwwu.tumblr.com.

Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu, was reviewed by Dr. Jen Harrison. Discover more books like Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code by following along with our reviews and articles tagged with , and .

Jen Harrison currently teaches English Composition and Composition Skills at East Stroudsburg University. She completed her PhD in Children's and Victorian Literature at Aberystwyth University in Wales, in the UK. There she also acted as an instructor teaching undergraduate courses on literature and literary theory, as well as further education courses on Children's Literature and Creative Writing. After a brief spell in administration, Jen then trained as a secondary school English teacher, and worked for several years teaching Secondary School English, working independently as a private tutor of English, and working in nursery and primary schools as a substitute teacher. After moving from the UK to the USA in 2016, Jen is very happy to have returned to higher education. Her current research focuses on three primary areas in the field of children’s literature: reader-writer relationships, thing-theory, and the supernatural; she is a reviewer for the International Research Society for the Study of Children’s Literature (IRSCL), as well as the Children's Book Review. Jen also writes an academic blog on Children's Literature, Worrisome Words: http://quantum.esu.edu/faculty/jharrison/. You can also find her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennifer.harrison.73594

No Comments

Leave A Comment