HomeBooks by AgeAges 4-8The Eye That Never Sleeps, by Marissa Moss and Jeremy Holmes | Book Review
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The Eye That Never Sleeps, by Marissa Moss and Jeremy Holmes | Book Review

The Children’s Book Review | March 25, 2019

The Eye That Never Sleeps- How Detective Pinkerton Saved President LincolnThe Eye That Never Sleeps: How Detective Pinkerton Saved President Lincoln

Written by Marissa Moss

Illustrated by Jeremy Holmes

Age Range: 6-9

Publisher: Abrams Books (2018)

ISBN: 978-1-4197-3064-1

What to Expect: History, Mystery, Gothic, Victorian

Sometimes history and real life can be every bit as exciting and extraordinary as the best fiction.  Sherlock Holmes, with his deer-stalker, pipe, and magnifying glass, might not be real, but young readers will delight in this new volume narrating the genuine, extraordinary adventures of the closest thing real-life has to offer: Allan Pinkerton, the first detective at the Chicago Police Department, and America’s most notorious private investigator.

Telling the story of Pinkerton’s rise to fame, from his humble beginnings as a Scottish fugitive right through to saving the life of future-President Lincoln, this volume is packed with excitement: there are late-night stake-outs, secret messages, and convoluted plans involving disguises and mysterious parcels.  Adding to the Gothic air of the volume is the intricate illustration, which combines historic fonts with muted tones of purple, black, and sepia, and illustrations rich in minute detail allowing readers to sift each image for clues of their own.  Particularly enjoyable are the newspaper inserts and hand-drawn maps, inviting readers to imagine themselves back in time.  The volume concludes with historical notes, and artist’s note, and a bibliography for further reading.  Both enjoyable narrative and thorough historical exploration, this is a non-fiction volume sure to be enjoyed by mystery fans young and old alike.

Available Here: 

About the Author

Marissa Moss is the bestselling author of the Amelia series, Barbed Wire Baseball, and Nurse, Soldier, Spy. She lives in Berkeley, California.

About the Illustrator

Jeremy Holmes has illustrated a number of children’s books, including the Templeton Twins series and There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. He lives in Abington, Pennsylvania.

The Eye That Never Sleeps: How Detective Pinkerton Saved President Lincoln, written by Marissa Moss and illustrated by Jeremy Holmes, was reviewed by Dr. Jen Harrison. Discover more books like Bridges!: With 25 Science Projects for Kids by following along with our reviews and articles tagged with , and .

Jen Harrison currently teaches English Composition and Composition Skills at East Stroudsburg University. She completed her PhD in Children's and Victorian Literature at Aberystwyth University in Wales, in the UK. There she also acted as an instructor teaching undergraduate courses on literature and literary theory, as well as further education courses on Children's Literature and Creative Writing. After a brief spell in administration, Jen then trained as a secondary school English teacher, and worked for several years teaching Secondary School English, working independently as a private tutor of English, and working in nursery and primary schools as a substitute teacher. After moving from the UK to the USA in 2016, Jen is very happy to have returned to higher education. Her current research focuses on three primary areas in the field of children’s literature: reader-writer relationships, thing-theory, and the supernatural; she is a reviewer for the International Research Society for the Study of Children’s Literature (IRSCL), as well as the Children's Book Review. Jen also writes an academic blog on Children's Literature, Worrisome Words: http://quantum.esu.edu/faculty/jharrison/. You can also find her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennifer.harrison.73594

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