HomeBooks by AgeAges 4-8Robotpedia, by Brenna Maloney | Book Review

Robotpedia, by Brenna Maloney | Book Review

The Children’s Book Review | April 24, 2019

RobotpediaRobotpedia

Written by Brenna Maloney

Age Range: 7-10

Publisher: Insight Kids (2018)

ISBN: 978-1-68383-608-7

What to Expect: Science, History, Technology, Interactive STEAM.

You may not realize it, but robots are all around us and are a surprisingly important part of human life in the twenty-first century.  Robots are used to manufacture cars, support military operations and fire-fighting rescues, deliver packages, and even perform surgery.  No longer confined to the realms of science fiction, robots are an irrefutable part of our world.  Robotpedia provides an in-depth exploration of these fascinating, cutting-edge companions, from their history in Ancient Greece and Victorian England, to where they might be headed in the future.

By far the most exciting feature of this encyclopedia is the interactive nature of almost every entry.  There are flaps to open and inserts which fold out, dials that turn, and even a poster to display on the wall.  These enticing additions to the main text encourages young readers to get hands-on and delve below the surface of the topic – quite literally.  Throughout the volume, explorations of real-life robots are interspersed with information about fictional favorites such as C-3po and Wall-E, underscoring the idea that reality can be as exciting as fiction. While only two or three entries touch upon the science and mechanics of how robots actually work, the volume makes up for this with end matter directing readers towards competitions, products, conventions, and camps to help them explore the field in greater depth.  Overall this is an enjoyable volume, and a wonderful endorsement of STEAM for young readers.

Available Here: 

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About the Author

Brenna Maloney is a writer and editor with more than twenty years professional experience. A long-time editor and book review writer for the Washington Post, and writer and editor for National Geographic, Brenna is currently the editor of National Geographic’s Explorer classroom magazine. Brenna is also the author of seven published books and served as the freelance editor of National Geographic’s chapter book series. Brenna has a master’s degree in journalism from Michigan State University and a bachelor’s degree in public and corporate communications from Butler University. She lives and works in Washington, D.C.

Robotpedia, written by Brenna Maloney, was reviewed by Dr. Jen Harrison. Discover more books like Robotpedia by following along with our reviews and articles tagged with , , , , , and .

Jen Harrison currently teaches English Composition and Composition Skills at East Stroudsburg University. She completed her PhD in Children's and Victorian Literature at Aberystwyth University in Wales, in the UK. There she also acted as an instructor teaching undergraduate courses on literature and literary theory, as well as further education courses on Children's Literature and Creative Writing. After a brief spell in administration, Jen then trained as a secondary school English teacher, and worked for several years teaching Secondary School English, working independently as a private tutor of English, and working in nursery and primary schools as a substitute teacher. After moving from the UK to the USA in 2016, Jen is very happy to have returned to higher education. Her current research focuses on three primary areas in the field of children’s literature: reader-writer relationships, thing-theory, and the supernatural; she is a reviewer for the International Research Society for the Study of Children’s Literature (IRSCL), as well as the Children's Book Review. Jen also writes an academic blog on Children's Literature, Worrisome Words: http://quantum.esu.edu/faculty/jharrison/. You can also find her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennifer.harrison.73594

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