HomeArticles Posted by Dr. Jen Harrison

Jen Harrison currently teaches English Composition and Composition Skills at East Stroudsburg University. She completed her PhD in Children's and Victorian Literature at Aberystwyth University in Wales, in the UK. There she also acted as an instructor teaching undergraduate courses on literature and literary theory, as well as further education courses on Children's Literature and Creative Writing. After a brief spell in administration, Jen then trained as a secondary school English teacher, and worked for several years teaching Secondary School English, working independently as a private tutor of English, and working in nursery and primary schools as a substitute teacher. After moving from the UK to the USA in 2016, Jen is very happy to have returned to higher education. Her current research focuses on three primary areas in the field of children’s literature: reader-writer relationships, thing-theory, and the supernatural; she is a reviewer for the International Research Society for the Study of Children’s Literature (IRSCL), as well as the Children's Book Review. Jen also writes an academic blog on Children's Literature, Worrisome Words: http://quantum.esu.edu/faculty/jharrison/. You can also find her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennifer.harrison.73594

jharriso11@po-box.esu.edu

Archive

Six Dots is not only a story about braille – it is also a story about reading, and about the power of education and the support and love of family.

A key contribution to supporting STEM education, My Amazing Body Machine introduces children to the complexity and ingenuity of their own bodies.

The Egg, by Britta Teckentrup, is an excellent way to show young readers that science is not necessarily incompatible with art, beauty, story, and culture.

The Girl From Everywhere is utterly enthralling. It is fast-paced and punchy, whisking the reader along on a sea-voyage through time and space, myth and reality, and, above all, adventure after adventure.