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The Children’s Book Review | March 21, 2014

Who-Was-Amelia_Earhart_LegacyImageEnter to win a Who Was? book from Grosset & Dunlap’s leading biography series.

Three (3) winners receive:

  • A copy of 1 women’s history selection of their choice from the list of Who Was? books featured below in the entry form.

Giveaway begins March 21, 2014, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends April 20, 2014, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Reading level: Ages 8-12

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: March 23, 2011

This is an abbreviated version of a list of books put together by Lauren Donovan from Random House Children’s Books.

TILLIE THE TERRIBLE SWEDE: How One Woman, a Sewing Needle, and a Bicycle Changed History

By Sue Stauffacher; illustrated by Sarah McMenemy

When Tillie Anderson came to America, all she had was a needle. So she got herself a job in a tailor shop and waited for a dream to find her. One day, a man sped by on a bicycle. She was told “bicycles aren’t for ladies,” but from then on, Tillie dreamed of riding—not graceful figure eights, but speedy, scorching, racy riding! And she knew that couldn’t be done in a fancy lady’s dress. . . . With arduous training and her (shocking!) new clothes, Tillie became the women’s bicycle-riding champion of the world. Sue Stauffacher’s lively text and Sarah McMenemy’s charming illustrations capture the energy of America’s bicycle craze and tell the story of one woman who wouldn’t let society’s expectations stop her from achieving her dream.

Alfred A. Knopf | January 25, 2011 |  Ages 5-8 | 40 pgs

Add this book to your collection: TILLIE THE TERRIBLE SWEDE: How One Woman, a Sewing Needle, and a Bicycle Changed History

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: March 8, 2011

Our shared history unites families, communities, and nations.  Although women’s history is intertwined with the history shared with men, several factors – social, religious, economic, and biological – have worked to create a unique sphere of women’s history. ~ The National Women’s History Project

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: March 1, 2010

March is National Women’s History Month. The National Women’s History Project, an organization whose mission is to “recognize and celebrate the diverse and historic accomplishments of women by providing information and educational materials and programs,” has announced that the theme for 2010 is Writing Women Back into History.  This is what they had to say:

“The history of women often seems to be written with invisible ink. Even when recognized in their own times, women are often not included in the history books.”

With so few books highlighting the brilliant women from our history, I felt that it was important to kick-off this important month of recognition with 5 books that not only acknowledge women’s achievements but celebrate them and empower young girls (our women of the future).