HomePosts Tagged "Autism"

The Children’s Book Review
Published: April 11, 2013

LeahsVoiceEnter to win an autographed copy of Leah’s Voice by Lori DeMonia’s; illustrated by Monique Turchan.

Leah’s Voice is a story that touches on the difficulties children encounter when they meet a child with special needs such as autism.

Giveaway begins April 11, 2013, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends May 9, 2013, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Reading level: Ages 6 and up

Paperback: 28 pages

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: April 1, 2011

Author Avril Webster created the Off We Go! series to help her son with an intellectual disability practice and visualize typical everyday and once-in-awhile outings to alleviate anxiety about what’s going to happen during these activities. Brightly illustrated in an uncluttered cartoon style, and featuring simple text vetted by a speech language pathologist, these stories tell and show kids what to expect.

Avril Webster: Books have had a big impact on our lives, right from the get go. I remember when [my son], Stephen, was a small baby and we had endless days and nights in hospital, I read to him. Book after book, I think hearing my voice soothed him and it helped us create that special intimate time, despite being in a hospital environment. And reading those books helped me cope too – helped to pass the time, distracted me and helped me feel like a ‘normal’ Mom. Stephen still loves many of those books!

By Ellen Viola Thalhamer III MS ED., B.C.S.E., for The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 11, 2010

“I’m a Daddy” and “Let’s Play Doctor” are social story books that were created in order to teach children with autism how to pretend play. For children who are learning to pretend play and socially interact with their peers, these books will be helpful in guiding them through the motions of pretending to be a daddy or a doctor. For those parents who focus on generalization, and receptive and expressive language, real life pictures associated with the stories have been added to the back of the books.

By Ellen Viola Thalhamer III, for The Children’s Book Review
Published: September 8, 2010

“I’m a Daddy” was created in order to teach children with autism how to pretend to be a daddy. For children who are learning to pretend play and socially interact with their peers, this book will be helpful in guiding them through the motions of pretending to be a daddy. For those parents who focus on generalization, and receptive and expressive language, real life pictures associated with parents have been added to the story book.