HomePosts Tagged "Books for Mikey"

He won’t read it.  He hates everything. #5

By David TeagueThe Children’s Book Review
Published: September 12, 2012

School has started.  Great news for some kids (a rare and exotic variety), bad news for some (more common), and mixed news for most.

Anyway, now that school rolling again, I drive the carpool van, and the other day, I ended up detouring past one of my city’s little wooden welcome signs, which proclaim our civic motto:  “Wecome to W–.  A Place to Be Somebody.”

He won’t read it.  He hates everything. #4

By David TeagueThe Children’s Book Review
Published: August 20, 2012

Of course, every boy isn’t a reluctant reader.  A lot of boys love books.  All we’re trying to do is get as many as possible to strike their pup-tents in camp #1 and pitch them in Camp #2.

To quote the great Jon Scieszka (which is something I do quite frequently and with stellar results):

“Boys aren’t believing that ‘Reading is wonderful.’ Reading is often difficult and boring for them. Let’s start with “Here is one book . . . you might like”

He won’t read it.  He hates everything. #3

By David TeagueThe Children’s Book Review
Published: July 7, 2012

On the first day of summer vacation when I was twelve years old, I got on my bicycle, rode three miles down the street through a tunnel of new leaves, emerged into lemon-colored sunshine in the middle of town, racked my bike, opened the front door of the library to release its peppery aroma into the juicy green afternoon, and saw a book with a fantastic cover awaiting me on the nearest wooden table: M.C. Higgins The Great.

(He won’t read it.  He hates everything.) #2

By David TeagueThe Children’s Book Review
Published: June 7, 2012

Last month in “Books for Mikey,” the topic of moms and dads came up as I brainstormed possible categories for this month. It went something like:

Books for Dads to finagle into the hands of their Mikeys, and possibly read at the same time and discuss later.

Sometimes, as I ponder tactics for encouraging the “reluctant readers” in my life (typically late-elementary through middle-school boys), I cast my mind back to an earlier generation’s paragon of averseness, Mikey [Life cereal commercial]. Only instead of confronting Mikey with healthy breakfast cereal, in