HomePosts Tagged "Matthew Cordell"

The Children’s Book Review | March 13, 2014

Like Carrot Juice on a Cupcake_coverEnter to win a set of all three books in Julie Sternberg’s Eleanor series.

One (1) winner receives:

Giveaway begins March 13, 2014, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends April 12, 2014, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

Age Range: Ages 7-10

[caption id="attachment_14220" align="alignleft" width="135"] Audrey Vernick[/caption] Audrey Vernick is the author of several picture books, including So You Want to Be a Rock Star, Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten? and Brothers at Bat, which was a New York Times Notable Book and Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books Blue Ribbon Award winner. A

By Nina Schuyler, The Children’s Book Review
Published: August 9, 2012

Justin Case: Shells, Smells, and the Horrible Flip-Flops of Doom
Illustration copyright © 2012 by Matthew Cordell

June shrugged off school’s schedule—the drop offs and pick-ups and the packing of lunch. Summer seemed to stretch out like a wide open lawn. But the acreage quickly filled with the schedule of camps—with drop offs and pick-ups and the packing of lunch.

Right about now, there’s something in the air. Maybe it’s the lighting or a new scent. But you begin to feel that summer is nearing its end. Before the scaffolding of the school schedule is fitted again, there is another attempt to get rid of routine. This, I think, is the real heart of summer. An earnest attempt to be schedule-less, to open up to unpredictability, maybe even to lose the concept of time. How? Travel. People pack their bags and go. Somewhere. Anywhere. Stay-over-night camp, relatives in another state, another city, anywhere other than where you are, it really doesn’t matter, just as long as rhythms and routines are set aside.

By Nicki Richesin, The Children’s Book Review
Published: April 25, 2012

Beautiful Dreamers

In celebration of National Poetry Month, we’ve hand-picked ten many-splendored new books. Children are born loving poetry from the moment they form their first babbling words to when they begin to tackle more complex rhythms and tongue twisters. As they acquire language and enjoy how it rolls off their tongues, they also gain an appreciation for the beauty of creative expression. Nothing quite tops that moment when they learn to recite their first nursery rhyme. So leave a poem in your child’s pocket and help him discover the appeal of modern poetry.