HomePosts Tagged "Native American"

Elizabeth Varadan | The Children’s Book Review | June 14, 2013 Blood Brothers in Louisbourg By Philip Roy Reading Age: 12-16 Paperback: 144 pages Publisher: Cape Breton University Press (August 15, 2012) What to Expect: The nature of courage; questions of war and diplomacy; what constitutes civilized culture or savagery; spirituality; survival in a strange land Jacques loves

By Phoebe Vreeland, The Children’s Book Review
Published: November 4, 2010

Hardscrabble Harvest By Dahlov IpcarThanksgiving is a celebration of abundance and there is a virtual cornucopia of children’s books about this holiday.  You can find a Thanksgiving themed book featuring every child’s favorite character from Amelia Bedelia to Scooby Doo.  Bookstore shelves are laden with picture books about the first Thanksgiving as well as ones about today’s holiday tradition.  There even seems to be a whole genre of entertaining books about turkeys on the run.

By Luisa LaFleur, The Children’s Book Review
Published: May 28, 2010

The path to self-discovery is a difficult topic, and an arduous journey. As parents, it’s one we face in determining our role with regard to our children but it’s also one we’re confronted with when our children reach adolescence. As they grow and begin to pull away from us, we’re obliged to try and guide them on the right path. Looking back, as I often do when I write these posts, I remember how my parents tried to guide me and the many times that I didn’t listen. The urge to resist them was greater than the urge to do the right thing-it’s something I’m not too proud of but I recognize it’s a right of passage and I’ll likely see similar behavior from my own children. And yet, I still harbor the vain hope that my children will be different. That their adolescence will be less turbulent because my relationship with them is different, and more evolved than in the previous generation. Perhaps it’s just wishful thinking.

I recently received two books that tackle the topic of self-discovery from a Native American point of view. They are geared to older children and pre-teens and the lessons they impart are valuable and timeless.